Top Greek-related News Articles: Week of June 19-25

Get our staff’s picks for ‘best of the web’ Greek-related news articles this week.

WindyCity Greek is your source for all positive Greek-related news and content. We scour the web so you don’t have to, and bring you the best! Check back every Saturday for a new list.

 

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Our staff’s top picks for Greek-related news articles this week:

For the first time after the discovery in of the 2,100-year-old Antikythera mechanism over a hundred years ago in an ancient shipwreck off the southwestern Aegean isle of ‪‎Antikythera, a complete rendering of all the inscriptions found inside this mechanism,  often described as ‪an ancient‪ astronomical calculator, wasunveiled in Piraeus last week (9.6), at the Aikaterini Laskaridis Foundation. Read more

 

 

AHEPA Athletic Hall of Fame Announces 2016 Inductees

The Hellenic Athletic Hall of Fame Selection Committee of the American Hellenic Educational Progressive Association (AHEPA), a leading membership-based association for the nation’s million American citizens of Greek heritage and Philhellenes, has selected its Hall of Fame Class of 2016, announced Supreme President John W. Galanis and Gregory J. Stamos, chairman, Hall of Fame Selection Committee. Read more

 

 

Aegean Summit: Bringing Together New and Independent Media

In two weeks time, on June 30th and July 1st, a new and promising forum will take place in Athens, which aims to inaugurate an annual international meeting on new and independent media in the Euro-Mediterranean and Middle East.  The Aegean Summit was born about a year ago, in the summer of 2015, among young and active professionals in journalism and media projects, who were meeting to exchange insights and contacts. Inspired by their collaborations, they decided to host a Summit as “an annual physical meeting point” that would provide a framework for these ideas and projects to be discussed in a more solid base and also to create synergies and partnerships. Read more

 

 

10 Must-Try New Sandwiches in Chicago

There’s no shortage of standout sandwiches in Chicago, from high-end bar fare to decadent breakfast creations. This summer, though, restaurants have really stepped up the dish with inspired menu additions that riff on everything from maki rolls to Italian beef. Here are the 10 new sandwiches you need to try in Chicago this season.  Which Greek-owned restaurant made the list? Read more

 

 

Phantom Gourmet: Niko Bar And Grill In West Bridgewater

At Niko Bar and Grill in West Bridgewater, it’s quite a family affair. You’ll find owner Peter Badavas, Peter’s father Steve, Peter’s Uncle John, and Peter’s lifelong friend David. The place is even named for Peter’s son, Niko. It’s a spot that makes you feel at home the second you walk through the door. Read more

 

 

Murals in NYC: 501(See)(Streets) nonprofit sponsors street art in Queens, Brooklyn, the Bronx

At an Amtrak underpass tucked away in Astoria, Queens, a man and a woman stand opposite one another with paint rollers and spray cans in their hands.

They’re putting the finishing touches on two giant murals — each one slightly bigger than a subway car — showing ancient Greek motifs, the national flag and philosophers like Socrates. Read more

 

 

Archaeologists Uncover Massive Naval Bases of the Ancient Athenians
Researchers have excavated ship sheds in the city of Piraeus that held triremes from the pivotal Battle of Salamis.

If he toured Mounichia harbor today, Xerxes the Great, ruler of the Persian Empire, might scoff at the pleasure yachts and fisherman that can primarily be found on the waters just south of Athens, Greece. But 2,500 years ago, when the protected harbor in Piraeus, a port city on the outskirts of Athens, was a full on naval base bristling with armed sailors and mean-looking triremes? That might have made him think twice about trying to invade Greece. Read more 

 

 

How Greek Drama Saved the City

At the climax of Aristophanes’ comedy Frogs, a tartly affectionate parody of Greek tragedy that premiered in 405 BCE, Dionysus, the god of wine and theater, is forced to judge a literary contest between two dead playwrights. Earlier in the play, the god had descended to the Underworld in order to retrieve his favorite tragedian, Euripides, who’d died the previous year; without him, Dionysus grumpily asserts, the theatrical scene has grown rather dreary. But once he arrives in the land of the dead, he finds himself thrust into a violent literary quarrel. Read more 

 

“First Lady of Wine” Triffon pairs with Chef Minaki for Opa! Fest in Troy

Madeline Triffon, “Detroit’s First Lady of Wine,” was the first American woman to be certified as a master sommelier, and she’s sharing some of her expertise in Troy this weekend.

The University of Michigan graduate lived in Greece as a child — a prelude to her involvement in the Opa! Fest. Read more

 

 

A Race Anchored in History

Every July, more than 350 boats line up at the shores of Chicago’s Lake Michigan as they embark on the Race to Mackinac Island, Michigan: the longest fresh water race in the world at 333 miles long, and one of the oldest, as well. What started in 1898 with just five boats has now garnered the attention of sailors worldwide, from Maine and California, to Hong Kong and Australia.

Winnetka residents Tom and Beth Ann Papoutsis are included in that cohort and have been since 2006 when they bought the 43-foot Renegade, a J133 named when Tom coined himself the “renegade of the family.” Read more

 



That’s it for this week! Check back next Saturday for a new list of our staff’s top picks for Greek-related news on the web. Be well!



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